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Suggested to take oxandrolone. Impact on HPG axix?

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General & Family Physician
Practicing since : 2010
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Dear Dr Kulbir XXXXXXX

Previously you gave a kind advice that any drug taken 10-15 years ago loses its impact because of long period of time. However , other doctors here are suggesting oxandrolone, if taken during development early pubertal years, can cause maturation of HPG axis and as this axis matures further into adulthood, this previous 'drug-induced' maturation remains. Kindly could you shed light on this . |I would be most grateful

with Best Regards,
XXXXXXX

Posted Wed, 9 Jan 2013 in Growth and Development in Children
 
 
Answered by Dr. Kulbir Singh 20 hours later
Hello Mr. R
First of all very thanks for the query. Your doctor is right is saying that it may cause maturation of HPG axis. It increases growth velocity and improves weight gain without excessive bone age advancement; all also improves psychosocial adjustment. But it shows its effect if taken in full dose and for a period of minimum 6 months.

But as per the topic that whether drug-induced maturation remains in adults, I am not sure about that. If I will get any information about it I will get back to you immediately. In my opinion as you have taken it in minimum dose it does not effect you any more. Rest your doctor can explain help you better.

Regards

Dr. Kulbir Singh
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suggested to take oxandrolone. Impact on HPG axix? 18 hours later
thank you,

I'd like to ask about long term implication of medications on cells.

I understand in cells that its material composition changes....what are thses changes and how often do they take place?

with Best Regards,
XXXXXXX
 
 
Answered by Dr. Kulbir Singh 21 minutes later
HelloXXXXXXX
I have already explained you about the changes that took place by the use of the drug. The changes are increase in growth velocity, improvement in psychological behavior and weight gain. It took place till the effect of the drug is their and that depends on the dose and frequency of the drug. The cells get activated and help in binding and connection.

Regards
Dr. Kulbir Singh
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suggested to take oxandrolone. Impact on HPG axix? 55 minutes later
Dear Dr XXXXXXX

Thank you for advice. I'd liket o know about effects on non renewable cells such as eye/ brain etc.

does the drug have any long term effects after cessation of it?

Regards
 
 
Answered by Dr. Kulbir Singh 4 hours later
Hello and thanks again
I have already explained your about the mechanism that take place in the cells (renewable and non renewable) in the previous discussion. Their is nothing new to say. The cells just activates and increase their process by the effect of the drug. The permanent damage that can not be changed depends on the dose of the drug. The temporary damage gets cured by cessation of the drug. If non renewable cells get damaged permanently than their mechanism get changed. I think you have got your answer.

Regards
Dr. Kulbir Singh
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suggested to take oxandrolone. Impact on HPG axix? 2 hours later
Thank you Dr XXXXXXX thats right we discussed before.

I have few final questions if i may,

In cells , the material composition changes as do the minerals....but how often does this take place daily, monthly yearly??

I was told every 7 years but as you have best answers i would like your opinion.

Other than ageing , what causes these changes? Proteins / amino acids food intake ?

Best Regards

 
 
Answered by Dr. Kulbir Singh 10 hours later
Hello XXXXXXX
Interesting query and like to answer it for you. I thing you are asking this for non-renewable cells? The answer is if the drug is able and used in proper dose can change the material composition of the cell. The process of recovery is little bit slow in non-renewable cells and may take 3-7 years to recover completely unless their is complete damage to the cell. Complete damage can not be recovered. Their are not much study that food intake has any effect, it may or may not. I am not 100% sure for that.

Regards
Dr. Kulbir Singh
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suggested to take oxandrolone. Impact on HPG axix? 2 days later
Thank you Dr XXXXXXX for your great advice.

How about low dose-short course anablic steroids' effects on later child's HPG axis ....does a short course of anabolic steroids taken during childhood (early stages of HPG maturation) have any 'lasting imprint' on future fully activated HPG axis??

Or is this wrong logic?

Best Regards,
XXXXXXX
 
 
Answered by Dr. Kulbir Singh 11 hours later
Hello XXXXXXX
The drug use in childhood can cause maturation of the HPG axis and with the withdrawal of the drug (if used for short period and low dose) the effect of the drug reduces and axis back to its normal functioning. There is not much effect of it in adult ( on no drug) with fully activated axis as the functioning came back to normal. But it is not found in all the patients, some of patient can have its effect for a long time.
The activity of the axis decreases with the age and leading to less production of the hormones in the later stage.

Regards
Dr. Kulbir Singh
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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