Get your Health question answered in 3 easy steps
A Doctor will be with you shortly
Ask a Doctor Now
191 Doctors are Online

Suffered panic attack and having heart palpitations. How to avoid this?

User rating for this question
Excellent
Answered by
Practicing since : 1966
Answered : 4506 Questions
Question
I have heart palpitations lasting from a panic attack suffered last night. My heart rate doesn't want to come down from around 96 to 103. Blood pressure is 126/90. What should I do?
Posted Tue, 19 Mar 2013 in Hypertension and Heart Disease
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan 25 minutes later
Hi friend,
Welcome to Health Care Magic

The supplement must have been washed out of the body by this time.
Symptoms after a week are unlikely to be related to it directly.
It could very well be fear and anxiety from the initial traumatic experience.

However, it is advisable to get investigated.
A thorough history and physical examination is the first step -
Electrocardiogram (EKG) – Routine 12-lead – is part of clinical examination.

HOLTER (24 to 48 hour ambulatory monitoring) / ECHOcardiogram / TMT (Treadmill exercise ECG) / LABORATORY work-up – may also be necessary, depending on the initial assessment and situation, for further assessment and assistance. The treating doctor may suggest them depending on need, based on his assessment of the situation.

Take care
Wishing speedy recovery
God bless
Good luck
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suffered panic attack and having heart palpitations. How to avoid this? 3 minutes later
Is it normal to have such a long duration of heigtened heart rate, though? Should I be concerned with this? Perhaps go to an ER?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan 4 minutes later
Hi

Yes. It is NOT normal to last so long
You should go and see a doctor - earlier, the better.

Regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suffered panic attack and having heart palpitations. How to avoid this? 7 minutes later
I still have high anxiety from the incident, so could that also be why I am still experiencing an accelerated heart rate? Are there any potential reasons other that? I am a highly anxious person, and I was traumatized badly from the incident. Could an anti-anxiety pill help with this?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan 13 minutes later
Hi

Medicines for anxiety certainly help.
Medicines like beta-blockers help both anxiety and palpitation.

Often, anxiety should be an exclusion diagnosis - after other causes have been considered, investigated and ruled out.

Self medication is not a wise option.
See your doctor.

All the best
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suffered panic attack and having heart palpitations. How to avoid this? 3 minutes later
Is it safe to wait until tomorrow to see a doctor?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan 17 minutes later
Hello

There may not be a problem in waiting for some more time - quite a few days have already passed, without complication; the rate is not very fast; the pressure is borderline; you are young. Hopefully, no serious complications are likely.

Regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suffered panic attack and having heart palpitations. How to avoid this? 36 hours later
Hello, I would just like to ask a few more questions. I had seen my physician about my heart and my EKG came back normal. However, I did notice that I had a burning sensation within my chest and arms after I had shoveled snow. Now, I am congested, but given that my EKG is normal, and my heart rate does relax when I am sleeping, should I be concerned and pursue other tests?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan 23 minutes later
Hi

A normal EKG is reassuring - but it is not foolproof.
Because of symptoms - that too effort related - you should go for further tests, as already suggested.

Good luck
Regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suffered panic attack and having heart palpitations. How to avoid this? 17 minutes later
For the other tests, can I go to an Urgent Care clinic to get an Echo Cardiogram? My physician told me that it was most likely anxiety causing it and was why he prescribed me an anti-anxiety. My heart rate came down to 82 as the EKG was performed. My blood pressure, when taken this morning, was normal. I don't have a doctor assigned to me yet, but on the 25th of March, I will be able to get a full evaluation. Should I wait this long? After all, these symptoms only starter occurring after a secondary panic attack; I just want to be reassured I will be okay and it does make me nervous every time I think about my heart. I just got done shoveling snow again, but suffered no burning sensations. It seems to only occur when I'm extremely nervous.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan 8 minutes later
Relax.
You are young; you sound intelligent – you stand an excellent chance of returning to usual previous status.

Be positive – why fear the heart beats faster?
The problem is only if it could not beat!

You are tolerating the rate well - means that you may not have any basic disease of the valve, muscle and so on.

Investigations are done is such cases - to rule out, rather than rule in.
The aim is to prevent future events and not to miss a treatable cause.

Be in touch with your doctor - it is a question of time and you will be well.
Don't worry
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suffered panic attack and having heart palpitations. How to avoid this? 12 minutes later
I guess I am nervous because after taking a stimulant for working out and then having an adverse reaction, it made me fear damage was done to my heart. I'm not familiar with heart attacks, but when I get burning sensations and feel that my heart rate is higher than normal, I fear something is wrong. I had a full week with having no issues. I don't know why one nervous breakd down caused me so much grief. I look online and find contradicting evidence as to ruling out any possible heart attack. I know I am young, and the chances are low, but I think that being I am slighy congested, I mistake breathing a bit harder as a sign of a heart attack. As mentioned, I wake up with a normal heart rate and pressure, but I quickly get nevous that something is wrong. A normal EKG can't even give me peace of mind now. I just want to go back to the week where everything was okay. My physician agreed there was no reason to believe there was heart disease. I just worry about turning into a hypochondriac; I don't have the insurance or money! I think I will schedule an appointment for an echo cardiogram just to be completely sure. I appreciate your reassurance with being happy my heart beats faster rather than not at all! I guess I also mixed up the signs of a heart attack as well.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan 26 minutes later
As you rightly point out, everything points to anxiety.
Like physical problem, psychological problem could also be diagnosed by their symptoms and signs.
Still, as a safety measure and with a view to prevent future episodes, all attempts are made to exclude organic diseases, before attributing to anxiety.

The web is flooded with information / it is all un-censored. The problem is to sift the ‘sense’ from ‘mis-sense’ and ‘non-sense’ / and an array of technical jargon.

Rest assured, you will be back to normal – in spite of doctors, if not because of doctors!!??...
I can see, you have the motivation – that is half the cure.
The rest is a question of time.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suffered panic attack and having heart palpitations. How to avoid this? 4 hours later
Again, thank you for your reassurance. I will wait for the rest of my slight cold to subside and go from there. Perhaps congestion is keeping my heart rate up, and as you said, that will wane with time. Thank you for giving me a little peace of mind. Now all tha remains is to remain calm when something minor happens; my EKG was normal and my heart rate is still within normal range as is my blood pressure. Should anymore issues arise, I will stay in contact with my doctor. Thank you.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan 3 hours later

Great to know that you are comfortable

Beware - many 'cold' medicines have decongestants - like phenylephrine - which in a few may increase the heart rate. Read the label, before buying / taking.

All the best
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suffered panic attack and having heart palpitations. How to avoid this? 25 hours later
Hello, again! I write again because I went to the doctor's again for antibiotics for my cold so I can quickly rid myself of the cold plaguing me. I got another EKG and a chest X-ray today, and both came back clean. However, upon eating dinner, my heart rate has risen to 120. I had orange chicken and some spicy tortilla chips. I know I keep asking questions relating to my heart rate, but given the tests I have gotten, albeit I haven't been able to get an echocardiogram yet, should I be worried? I also ate until I was very full and I did drink a lot of water within a short period of time. Again, is this normal?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anantharamakrishnan 45 minutes later
Hi

Normal rate ranges from 60 to 100.
It varies continuously / rises in several situations.
A rate till 140 is called Sinus Tachycardia (exaggeration of normal sequence) and is often a reaction to life situations. Fever and food here might have been responsible.

ECHO / Holter / Endocrine glands like thyroid (Thyrotoxicosis) and adrenal (Pheochromocytoma) help to exclude underlying problems. They are necessary, though not urgent

Regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Question is related to
Diseases and Conditions
Medical Topics

The user accepted the expert's answer

Ask a Cardiologist

© Ebix, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
All the information, content and live chat provided on the site is intended to be for informational purposes only, and not a substitute for professional or medical advice. You should always speak with your doctor before you follow anything that you read on this website. Any health question asked on this site will be visible to the people who browse this site. Hence, the user assumes the responsibility not to divulge any personally identifiable information in the question. Use of this site is subject to our Terms & Conditions
Already Rated.
Your rating:

Ask a Doctor