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Pregnant. Diagnosed with amniotic band syndrome in lower placenta. What are the risks?

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May 2013
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My Wife, 28 yrs of age. She is pregnant. Her gestation periord is 21 weeks. Her recent Anomaly test showed that she is having Amniotic band syndrome is noted in the lower part of placenta. Please tell me whether this is a major or minor concern.
Posted Wed, 19 Dec 2012 in Pregnancy
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sree Gouri SR 1 hour later
Hi,
Thanks for the query.

Amniotic band syndrome can occur due to partial rupture of amniotic sac and there could be associated defect in blood circulation.
The prognosis depends on the location and severity of the constriction bands.
Bands wrapped around the peripheral organs like limbs can cause syndactyly, clubfoot etc.
If the bands are present near the head, neck, umbilical cord etc. they can be life threatening to the fetus.
Treatment options are plastic surgery to the affected part after birth. Rarely in case of involvement of vital organs fetal surgery can be considered.

Hope I have answered your query. I will be available to answer your follow up queries. If you are satisfied with all my answer, please rate the answer after closing the discussion.
Take care.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Pregnant. Diagnosed with amniotic band syndrome in lower placenta. What are the risks? 21 hours later
I am aware of the explanations that has been provided. Please tell me that as the report shows the Amniotic band syndrome is noted in the lower part of placenta, What is the amount of risk involved and what can be the prognosis.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sree Gouri SR 1 hour later
Hi,

The risk depends on the part of the fetus which is located near lower part of placenta, where the band is located.
The placenta contains two layers amnion and chorion on fetal side. The partial rupture of amnion causes the syndrome whereas chorion remains intact. So the circulatory function of that part of the placenta can be disturbed to some extent.
But the severity mainly depends on the affected fetal parts.
Usually the defect will not be severe and the prognosis will be good. But rarely severe deformity can result with guarded prognosis.
Wish you Good Health, If you are satisfied with my response please rate the answer after closing the discussion.
Take care.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Pregnant. Diagnosed with amniotic band syndrome in lower placenta. What are the risks? 47 minutes later
Which part of the fetal is located in the lower part of placenta?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sree Gouri SR 9 hours later
Hi,

That can be seen in the ultrasound. In 21 weeks the position of the baby will change continuously due to the small size of the baby and comparatively more liquor.
So if the amniotic band forms that can affect the part which lies near to it at that time.
So it is difficult to predict the part that can get affected and the prognosis at present.
Better to undergo periodic ultrasound examinations to detect any possible problem at the earliest.
Wish you Good Health, If you are satisfied with my response please rate the answer after closing the discussion.
Take care.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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