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Lump in the breast, lobular carcinoma, biopsy and mammogram done. Chances of malignancy to other organs?

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During a routine exam, the ultrasound showed a 12mm suspicious mass (u4) in my right breast. I had a CNB on July the 22nd of the lump and 4 samples were taken. The result was a B2 (non malignant). I repeated the CNB on September the 12th. The lump was still 12mm, the mammogram was fine, the ultrasound showed the limph nodes and the other breast were clear but the result of the biopsy is a lobular carcinoma grade 2.
Which are the probabilities that the cancer has spread in these to other organs since it was first found in July?
Posted Sat, 21 Apr 2012 in Breast Cancer
 
 
Answered by Dr. Robert Galamaga 6 hours later
Hello and thanks for the query.

Your question is a good one and I will work on providing some good information and recommendations regarding what is going on.

You indicated that you have had two biopsy procedures done with the most recent one revealing evidence of malignant cells. The likelihood is low that these cells have metastasized to other organs at this point.

Right now it will be important for you to see a breast surgeon for a consultation and to decide on a surgical approach to remove the cancerous cells. Commonly a surgeon will perform a lumpectomy which is a procedure where the cancerous cells and a margin of normal cells are removed as well. A pathologist will then review the lumpectomy pecimen to confirm that there are no remaining cncerous cells.

At the same time, a sentinel lymph node biopsy may be performed where the surgeon uses a special XXXXXXX to sample the lymph node which is closed to the area where the cancer was found is evaluated. If cancer is found in the node he may remove some additional lymph nodes as well. If not then the procedure will be completed.

After the lumpectomy it will be necessary for you to discuss your case with a medical oncologist as well as a radiation oncologist so they may make appropriate recommendations regarding approaching this diagnosis with a curative intent.

I am sure you will do fine and your doctors will help you achieve a cure. We are getting better and better at screening and treating these types of cancers and women are surviving for decades nomads with a diagnosis much similar to the one you report here.

I thank you again for the query and hope my response has been informative If you have any additonal concerns or additional information you could provide I would be happy to address or review them.

Sincerely,

Dr. Galamaga
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Lump in the breast, lobular carcinoma, biopsy and mammogram done. Chances of malignancy to other organs? 3 hours later
Thanks, How is it possible that the same lump, shows two different results after few months? The specialist was very confident the first time that she captured the right area.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Robert Galamaga 20 hours later
Hello and thanks for the followup.

It is possible that the initial biopsy was done in the correct location but that it did not pick up some of the cancerous cells. We see this in a small percentage of biopsies actually. I am glad they did a subsequent one in your place to truly guide treatment.

I thank you again for the query and hope my response was helpful. If you have additional concerns I am here for you.

Sincerely,

Dr. Galamaga
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Lump in the breast, lobular carcinoma, biopsy and mammogram done. Chances of malignancy to other organs? 5 hours later
Thanks for your response, my last question: the lesion measures 12mm of which part is non malignant, it is below the nipple, the MRI scan and ultrasound scan showed that the lymph nodes were clear. The cancer is Grade 2. What are the chances that i will need to do chemo?
Regards
 
 
Answered by Dr. Robert Galamaga 31 hours later
Hello again.

Chances are low but the ultimate recommendations will come after the lumpectomy is done. If for some reason the focus of tumor cells is larger for example 20 mm, chemotherapy may be considered.

MRI is excellent but the actual pathologist review is the ultimate thing we need to see. Also the specimen will be tested for estrogen and progesterone receptors.

If these receptors are found on the cancerous cells, you will likely be advised to take a medication such as Tamoxifen - an estrogen receptor blocker, for 5 years to further advance the likelihood of cure into the high 90 percent range.

Thanks again for the query. Please let me know, if I may be of any additional assistance.

Wish you good health.

Regards.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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