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Knee pain and popping sound behind knee. Had hip pain, paralysis, baker's cyst and inner meniscus tear. What is it?

DOCTOR OF THE MONTH - Nov 2013
Nov 2013
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Neurologist
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I have been experiencing first 5 years ago extreme pain in right hip leading to paralysis for a few weeks now left with complete numbness and pain on complete left inside from big toe up to groin. Sometimes get shooting pain from knee to groin or if I bend leg inward to touch other knee. Never goes away. Also had a small bakers cyst and inner menisicus tear which occurred afterwards which the tear was operated on.
Now I am having outward knee pain in left leg and behind knee with a persistent popping sound.
What could these conditions be? I had been diagnosed with lumbar sacral plexitis with the right leg.
I am recently diagnosed with generalized dystonia having movement disorders.
Can you recommend a great neurologist in my area connected to a great hospital.
Tired of living this way. Condition is only worsening.
Posted Tue, 11 Sep 2012 in Brain and Spine
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sudhir Kumar 3 hours later
Thank you for contacting Healthcare Magic.
I have gone through your complaints in detail. It is unfortunate that you have to suffer so much of pain and inconvenience in doing routine daily activities.
The problem in the right lower limb (hips to legs) seems to be the residual effects of lumbo-sacral plexitis. The main symptoms are pain in the hip/knee region, tingling & numbness and weakness of legs. There are good medications to relieve the neuropathic pain such as pregabalin, gabapentin and duloxetine. These are prescription drugs and your neurologist would be able to prescribe them.
Regarding the left knee problem, it seems to be connected to knee joint, possibly mild osteo-arthritis of the knee. A consultation with an Orthopedic surgeon would be useful in this regard.
Regarding generalized dystonia, there are good medications such as trihexiphenydyl, tetrabenazine, sodium valproate, etc. In some selected cases, botox injections may be useful. In addition, physiotherapy is also useful.
I hope I have been able to answer your queries. Please get back if you have any more queries.
Best wishes,
Dr Sudhir Kumar MD DM (Neurology) XXXXXXX Consultant Neurologist
Apollo Health City, Hyderabad
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Knee pain and popping sound behind knee. Had hip pain, paralysis, baker's cyst and inner meniscus tear. What is it? 14 minutes later
DEAR DR XXXXXXX
WHEN I WAS TOLD IT MAY BE LUMBAR SACRAL PLEXITIS THE DR. THOUGHT IT WOULD WORK ITS WAY OUT IN NO MORE THAN 2 YEARS. WILL I HAVE THIS CONDITION FOR LIFE AND WILL IT GET WORSE? CAN IT BE FIXED WITH SURGERY?
I ALSO HAVE NO SAPHENOUS NERVE CONDUCTION ON EITHER SIDE OF MY LEGS.
AND MY REPORT SAID PROBLEMS WITH THE FEMORAL NERVE BACK THEN.

THE OTHER PROBLEM WITH THE LEFT KNEE CAME ON SUDDENLY. I ALSO NOTICED THAT WHEN I HIT MY KNEE AGAINST A CHAIR I SAW STARS. JUST FOR YOUR INFO.

I TAKE KLONOPIN , CYMBALTA, AND BACLOFIN. ALL WHICH MAKE ME SUPER TIRED AND VERY DEPRESSED.

CAN YOU RECOMMEND A VERY GOOD NEUROLOGIST IN MY AREA. I LIVE IN
PIPERSVILLE, PA NEAR PHILADELPHIA, PLUS A ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON.
I HAVE BEEN TO A FEW DRS OVER THE YEARS AND NO ONE REALLY IS HELPING ME.
THANK YOU XXXXXXX
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sudhir Kumar 8 hours later
Hi XXXXXXX
Thank you for getting back with more info.
Regarding lumbar sacral plexitis, treatment consists of medications and physiotherapy. Surgery is not advised for the same. Recovery is maximal in the first two years, however some improvement may occur even after that. Definitely, it does not get worse over time; however, some problems may remain for long. Findings on nerve conduction studies improve over time, however, it is not a must for patient's clinical improvement (you can show improvement despite the nerve test showing abnormalities).
Knee problem can definitely be sorted out by the orthopedic surgeon.
The neurologist would change the medications and dose in such a way that you have the maximum benefit without any significant adverse effects.
I don't personally know any doctors in your area, however, local websites may be helpful.
With best wishes,
Dr Sudhir Kumar MD DM XXXXXXX Consultant Neurologist
Apollo Health City, Hyderabad
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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