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Having pain in chest due to aneurism and noticed blood in saliva. Is this a sign of an illness?

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General & Family Physician
Practicing since : 2001
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Where in the chest would a pain from the aneurism be and would blood in the saliva in the morning be a symptom of my condition?
Posted Fri, 22 Nov 2013 in Hypertension and Heart Disease
 
 
Answered by Dr. Michelle Gibson James 29 minutes later
Brief Answer: it would not cause blood in the mouth Detailed Answer: HI, thanks for using healthcare magic The ascending aorta is that part of the aorta that rises from the heart. The aorta then continues into a arch and descends into the other aspects of the chest and abdomen. An ascending aortic aneurysm is one that is found in the ascending aspect of this aorta. Most persons with aneurysms in the chest do not have any symptoms. Blood in the saliva would not be a symptom of an aneurysm. This is because the blood would have to come from either the gastrointestinal tract (mouth from the teeth , lips or gums, esophagus due to reflux or inflammtion) or the respiratory tract (related to sinus disease, larynx, airways). The heart and the blood vessels associated with it such as the aorta do not have any direct connection to the mouth which would allow this blood to be seen. The most common symptom of these aneurysm would be pain in the chest. In the case of a rupture there would also be shortness of breath due to loss of blood. Ascending aneurysms cause pain in the anterior (front part ) of the chest while persons with aneurysms involving the arch have pain that seems to go towards the neck. I hope this helps, feel free to ask any other questions
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Follow-up: Having pain in chest due to aneurism and noticed blood in saliva. Is this a sign of an illness? 28 minutes later
The pain that I occasionally have in my chest has been going on for several years,then I feel fine for a long time.Could this pain possibly be from an aortic aneurism?Thank you
 
 
Answered by Dr. Michelle Gibson James 1 hour later
Brief Answer: normally it causes no symptoms Detailed Answer: HI Most persons with thoracic (chest) aneurysms do not have any symptoms. If symptoms do occur, it is most likely to be chest pain. It is possible that your chest pain can be related to the aneurysm. There are other causes for chest pain, it can be related to any structure in the chest from the skin inwards. The skin- herpes zoster Muscle and bones- inflammation or trauma to any of these areas can result in pain which is usually worse with movement involving the particular muscle or bone or compression of the area The esophagus- pain results from reflux or spasm of the esophagus Lungs- this can occur from different lung conditions Heart- usually worse on activity and relieved by rest You can consider a CT scan of the chest to assess the status of aneurysm. This would be able to determine if there is any change in the aneurysm. Please feel free to ask anything else
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Follow-up: Having pain in chest due to aneurism and noticed blood in saliva. Is this a sign of an illness? 20 hours later
I am thinking of getting an endovascular stent put into my acending aortic artery through the groin.Once in place I would like to know the chances that this would solve the problem for good and that I would'nt need any other surgery.Also would it enable me to live as long as I would have if I didn't have this problem? Thank you
 
 
Answered by Dr. Michelle Gibson James 1 hour later
Brief Answer: it is an effective procedure Detailed Answer: HI Endovascular stents are placed using a catheter inserted into the groin.A stent is then placed in the affected area of the aorta. Medical studies have shown that this procedure protects against the possibility of rupture of the aneurysm. Normally to be a candidate for this procedure, the aneurysm must be unruptured and be 5 cm or more in length. The length is determined by imaging investigations. This procedure would prevent rupture and allow you to continue as though the aneurysm was not present because it would have been effectively treated. You can feel free to ask anything else
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