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Have bumps on one side of penis, don't hurt but itches. Chances of contracting STD?

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Dear doctor,

I have small/"tiny" bumps on one side of my penis on the end side of my penis head near head-shaft border. I'm planning to go get tested soon, but I would like to know a few things first:

1. Will the touching of vaginal fluid on the skin of my stomach still be very vulnernable for STI transmission like genital herpes? Neither am I nor my partner are sure whether she has genital herpes. This is my biggest fear, but I will refrain from making any self-diagnoses.

2. My bumps don't hurt, peeing is not painful whatsoever, but my bumps are slightly itchy. I already have scattered bumps around my penis head that are white but are much much less visible than where my tiny bump clusters are occurring.

3. Interestingly, the bumps which I have is where I apply this most pressure when I masturbate.

4. How long should I wait after sexual contact before going in for a check up?

Posted Sun, 4 Aug 2013 in Sexually Transmitted Diseases
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anjana Rao Kavoor 2 hours later
Hi XXXXX
Thanks for writing in.

I would appreciate your concern for medical attention and help you as much possible in clearing your doubts.

1. Will the touching of vaginal fluid on the skin of my stomach still be very vulnernable for STI transmission like genital herpes? Neither am I nor my partner are sure whether she has genital herpes. This is my biggest fear, but I will refrain from making any self-diagnoses.

There is evidence of STI transmission occurring through direct skin-to-skin contact during oral, genital, or anal sex with an infected partner. Having said this, during sex, in the heat of the situation, people often forget to limit their actions and there can be progress to oral or penetrative sex.

2. My bumps don't hurt, peeing is not painful whatsoever, but my bumps are slightly itchy. I already have scattered bumps around my penis head that are white but are much much less visible than where my tiny bump clusters are occurring.

You might be having genital warts which is caused by some sub-types of human papillomavirus. These occur in clusters and appear as tiny bumps which get itchy later on, something similar to what you have described. This is highly contagious and I suggest you get a confirmation from your doctor.

3. Interestingly, the bumps which I have is where I apply this most pressure when I masturbate

Well, masturbation technique is a subjective behavior. Warts can have many types of distribution.

4. How long should I wait after sexual contact before going in for a check up?

You must not wait after sexual contact if you have these tiny itchy bumps. You and your partner must get examined by your doctor and seek treatment for it. Some of these infections are highly contagious and early treatment is the best.

I hope this answers your queries,

Write back in case of any doubts,

Dr A. Rao Kavoor
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Have bumps on one side of penis, don't hurt but itches. Chances of contracting STD? 15 hours later
Though I have just given you a description only, what are the differences between HPV-related genital warts and herpes-related genitsl warts?

Also, I feel a great need to go to my family practice doctor, however, I am not living where my family doctor practices because I'm interning in another city. That being said, are there ways for me to walk into somewhere where I can go for a test in a different city?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Anjana Rao Kavoor 14 hours later
Hi XXXXX
Thanks for writing in again.

Inspite of being sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and affecting the genitals in both men and women following transmission through sexual contact, genital herpes and genital warts are two very different in their causing organisms, appearance and treatment.

Genital herpes:
Genital herpes is caused by the HSV). There are two forms of this virus, HSV-1 affecting the lips and mouth and causes fever with blisters, and HSV-2 causing blisters to form on the genitals, anus, thighs, and buttocks. Herpes infection stays in the body but goes through periods of activity and dormancy.

Disease activity: When activated, the virus travels down the nerves to the infected skin where its activity causes blisters to form. This is a painful condition. After a few days, those blisters burst and turn into open sores or ulcers. Eventually, scabs form over the wounds and the sores heal. The whole process can take as long as 4 weeks to complete. A person is highly contagious while the disease is active in his or her body. Transmission rates are very high during active disease. Most often children, elderly and immune compromised patients manifest active disease very fast.

A person who is newly infected with genital herpes will experience their first outbreak within 14 days. They may have multiple outbreaks during their first year, but the number of outbreaks will gradually reduce each year thereafter. There is no permanent cure for genital herpes, though research is ongoing and the primary treatment option is to take antiviral medications.


Genital warts
Genital warts are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). HPV is common in men and women. However, the majority of people have no symptoms of the disease. The warts are typically flesh colored, look like cauliflower tops, and may be raised or flat. They can form inside or outside the vagina or anus, the cervix or vaginal walls, the penis, scrotum, thighs, lips, mouth, tongue, throat, hands, and basically any part of the body.

Disease activity: HPV is unpredictable. Even if you cannot see the warts, you can still spread or contract the human papilloma virus from an infected partner. Warts may begin developing 6 weeks to 6 months after infection. However, not everyone who comes into contact with HPV will develop genital warts and, in some people, the disease will stay dormant for years before producing warts.
Symptoms of genital warts include increased painless warts to start with and subsequent itching, and dampness near the warts in the genital area. In women there may be vaginal discharge, vaginal bleeding during sex. Genital warts can affect any person of any age or gender. Sex is the primary mode of transmission. There is no permanent cure for HPV and treatment for genital warts typically involves medication, skin treatments, or surgical removal of the warts.


In conclusion, both conditions are recognizable, and you should be checked out by a doctor as soon as possible if you begin exhibiting the signs of genital herpes or genital warts. Your doctor will likely prescribe medication to treat the condition.

You can consult any dermatologist in your city.
I hope this answers your queries.

Write back in case of any doubts.

Dr A. Rao Kavoor
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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