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Had a hernia repair by incision. Had definite ripping and bleeding sensation underneath scar. Normal?

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Hello. I am a 47 year old male.
Two weeks ago I had a hernia repair by incision and mesh.

Two days ago I was walking briskly, forgetting to take it easy when I felt a definite ripping and bleeding sensation underneath my scar. There was a brief sharp pain which quickly subsided to a dull ache. The area around the scan became very warm as though - I thought - there had been an XXXXXXX bleed.
I now have discomfort, but no more than after the operation. Is this a normal part of the healing?
Posted Thu, 16 May 2013 in General Health
 
 
Answered by Dr. Achuo Ascensius 2 hours later
Hello,
thanks for the query.

Surgical wounds cut through the skin down through the subcutanous layer and fascia. These layers contain pain receptors that respond to pain and so during the healing process there's pain due to the affection of the pain receptors by the cut and also due to inflammation created around the wound needed for healing.

Such pain receptors become stimulated following movement of the cut area which stimulates the pain killers. Pain in the initial period is due to the cut and the inflammation as the healing goes on and would eventually die off as healing goes to completion.

However, after complete healing, it is still possible to have some mild pains occasionally at an operated site but then mild pains.

Hope this answers your query. If you have further query, i will be waiting to help. If you do not have further query, you could close the discussion and rate the answer.
Best regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Had a hernia repair by incision. Had definite ripping and bleeding sensation underneath scar. Normal? 8 minutes later
Can I please double-check I am talking to a real doctor. The statement

"Such pain receptors become stimulated following movement of the cut area which stimulates the pain killers."

is incorrect. Also, the statement

"it is still possible to have some mild pains occasionally at an operated site but then mild pains"

is nugatory.

I am mainly concerned about the feeling of bleeding as distinct to the feeling of pain. I understand that fresh wounds are painful and that the pain receeds as the wound heals.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Achuo Ascensius 1 hour later
Hello,
Thanks once more for writing.

Sorry for the grammar but what is most important is understanding the notion behind. Was a little in a hurry because we had a power cut and my battery was draining down.

Well, what i meant is that, during incision, the wound stimulates pain receptors ( a receptor is a sensory organ that perceives a stimulus e.g. retina for light, ear for hearing etc.) that are responsible for pain sensation. Also, inflammation which is a normal body response needed for healing also stimulates the pain receptors.The pain gradually dies down as healing goes on.

When the cut area is moved, there is increase stimulation of the pain receptors and that accounts for the pain you felt.

Bleeding is a common complication following surgery. During surgery, blood vessels are cut and not all are necessarily ligated, thus the non ligated vessels
could bleed. If you engaged in a quick or sudden movement of the cut area, the healing vessels could be traumatized and that will lead to bleeding. However, after two weeks following your surgery, its less likely to have a severe bleeding unless the wound was infected and and the healing was retarded. But from your description i am very much convince all is okay and there is little to worry about.

Hope this answers your query. If you do have further query, i will be glad to help. If you do not have further query, you could close the discussion and rate the answer.
Best regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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