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Got painful bump in mouth after eating crunchy food. Could it be tumor or oral hpv?

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ENT Specialist
Practicing since : 1991
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I'm a healthy guy...I don't drink or smoke. I've got a pea sized bump in my mouth on my cheek tissue that came up after eating some very crunchy food. It is floppy, as if the tissue was cut away from the inner cheek. It is not hard. As it is floppy, it freely moves around by my tongue. When my mouth is closed, it is next to my teeth. When my mouth is open, it is in the middle of the two sets of teeth. It is painful and has      a white head. I would like any advice on this and what to do. I'm also a big worrier so I would like confirmation this is not a tumor or something crazy like an hpv oral wart. Thank you!
Posted Fri, 11 Jan 2013 in Dental Health
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sumit Bhatti 1 hour later
Hi,

Thank you for your query.

1. The swelling is near the opening of the right parotid (Stensen's) duct and may be involving it.

2. It is possible that you noticed it after eating some very crunchy food even though that was not a direct cause. Another possibility is an abrasion or cheek-bite caused near to the parotid duct papilla.

3. Get an initial examination and duct probing done by an ENT Specialist or a Dentist to confirm this and start medications if infection is suspected. Do not rush into a biopsy. This does not appear to be like a wart.

4. If the swelling persists after a few weeks, get a repeat examination done and share the reports here for further advice.

Regards.
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Follow-up: Got painful bump in mouth after eating crunchy food. Could it be tumor or oral hpv? 4 minutes later
I've visited a general nurse practitioner yesterday as it was the only health specialist I could get into on such short notice near the holidays. He stated that look like my teeth or food had gotten against that cheek tissue and pulled some of it away causing the swelling flap that you see in the pictures. He said it looked like a piece of meat had been filet'ed. with this seem to go online with your diagnosis? it feels symmetrical with where the duct is on the other side though. what could some possible causes be for this? thank you so much
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sumit Bhatti 32 minutes later
Hi,

Thank you for writing back.

1. Given an off-hand sudden task of identifying the Parotid (Stensen's) duct, most doctors would fail to locate it, unlike the Submanibular (Wharton's) duct under the tongue.

2. The congestion and edema must have worsened after an abrasion or cheek bite. Theoretically a small piece of food debris could be stuck in the opening or a mild local infection, cyst, minor salivary gland or wart may be responsible.

3. Since you do not have a cheek swelling (Parotid Swelling), this should be mild. Use a medicated mouth wash.

4. Get a Specialist opinion by direct examination and probing.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Got painful bump in mouth after eating crunchy food. Could it be tumor or oral hpv? 9 hours later
You mentioned wart this time as possible but previously said it does not appear as such. Now i am a bit confused. The swelling of the bump has gone down today and it definitely feels to be made of nothing but cheek tissue unlike a wart. Can you please reassure me this is unlikely a wart as I am not really sexually active and have a large paranoia anxiety about things like this.
I have also posted to do photos of the bump today as it has gone down in size just a little bit. It does not flap nearly as much. Note the white head and redness on the rest.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sumit Bhatti 7 hours later
Hi,

Thank you for writing back.

1. It does not really look like a wart. I mentioned it only to complete the the list of possible lesions.

2. The congestion and edema has definitely decreased.

3. Why don't you just get it examined and settle the issue in stead of guessing and worrying?

4. Get a Specialist opinion by direct examination and probing.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Got painful bump in mouth after eating crunchy food. Could it be tumor or oral hpv? 19 hours later
Hi doctor,

Unfortunately these next few days are tough to see a specialist in person because it is Christmas here in the States. My normal doctor is closed for the next few days. However, I did go to a minor care center last night operated by a hospital to be seen as it was all that was open and available. The doctor stated that it seems something cut the flap of skin away from the inner cheek and it has become swollen and infected thereafter. She put me on Keflex to help with the infection. If it is ok with you, I would like to keep this conversation open for a couple of days and just touch base with photos on the progress of healing to make sure it looks ok since I am unable to get to a family physician here. I have attached the photos of today. It has gone down in size a little bit more. Does it still look like it's on a good track to heal? Most pain has subsided. Thanks.
XXXXXXX
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sumit Bhatti 11 hours later
Hi,

Thank you for writing back.

1.The swelling has definitely come down and it is healing.

2. You may safely complete the course of medication and get yourself examined nest week by a Specialist.

3. In terms of severity, this swelling now appears to be well on it's way to healing. My concern is only whether it involves the parotid salivary duct and whether any recurrence can be prevented.

You may continue with your follow up.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Got painful bump in mouth after eating crunchy food. Could it be tumor or oral hpv? 23 minutes later
Strangely enough I feel a similar but far less severe swelling on the other side of my mouth perfectly symmetrical with this side. Would it be common of any condition for both ducts to swell?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sumit Bhatti 12 hours later
Hi,

Thank you for writing back.

1. That's possible with a infection or dental problems.

2. You should respond to the medication as the first side is healing. Hence there should be no worse an inflammation or infection even if it develops on the other side.

3. Viral infections may take their course in spite of antibiotics. Use anti-inflammatory medication, a medicated oral rinse and get a check up as soon as possible.

4. There can be other reasons such as eating on the other side, poor oral hygiene due to the first swelling, constantly feeling the area with your tongue may have caused abrasions and so on.

5. This discussion should ideally be done after some examination and investigations.

Wishing you a speedy recovery.

Regards.
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Follow-up: Got painful bump in mouth after eating crunchy food. Could it be tumor or oral hpv? 28 minutes later
I will close the conversation. Thank you for all your help. I would like to post one last follow up picture to make sure it's still looking good. Also, am i safe to kiss my girlfriend? Thank you.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sumit Bhatti 10 minutes later
Hi,

Thank you for following up.

1. The healing is progressing fine.

2. You should avoid kissing you girlfriend for a week or so.

3. Get a check up as early as possible.

Wishing you a good health.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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