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EKG report shows Possible old inferolateral myocardial infarct. What does this mean? Pertain to stressful breathing and heart beats?

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What does "Possible old inferolateral myocardial infarct" in regard to an EKG report mean? Does it pertain to stressful breathing and the heart beats?
Posted Wed, 10 Jul 2013 in Hypertension and Heart Disease
 
 
Answered by Dr. Kerry Pottinger 19 minutes later
Hi,

Thank you for your question.

Your EKG has shown changes that indicate you may have had a heart attack in the past. However, in order to make a firm diagnosis of a heart attack certain blood tests need to be carried out at the time and usually, but not always, there would be chest pain. Therefore, it cannot be confirmed that the changes are definitely due to a heart attack.

These changes are not due to stressful breathing. The changes that the EKG have shown do not relate to heart beats as such but more to the nature of the electrical activity shown in the EKG.

I hope this has helped you. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Regards,
Dr K A Pottinger
MBChB FRCA
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: EKG report shows Possible old inferolateral myocardial infarct. What does this mean? Pertain to stressful breathing and heart beats? 6 hours later
My EKG reads: Interpretation: Sinus Rhythm and directly below it reads: Possible old inferolateral myocardial intarct What does the Sinus Rhythm mean?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Kerry Pottinger 5 hours later
Hi,
Sinus rhythm is a normal heart rhythm. This is usually between 60 to 100 beats per minute and regular.
If you have any further questions, please contact me for further clarification.
Best regards,
Dr K A Pottinger
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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