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Does steroid treatment cause changes to cell and have residual effects?

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General Surgeon
Practicing since : 2002
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Hi , I have a question about past steroid treatment I had aged 14. It was short course of oxandrolone. I understand steroid have ability to cause changes to cells. I'm concerned the changes to cells still persist today as the cells reproduce 'changed copy' of themselves. So in a way the steroid has a lasting legacy. Please could you shed light to make me understand
Posted Fri, 24 Jan 2014 in Child Health
 
 
Answered by Dr. Deepak Kishore Kaltari 57 minutes later
Brief Answer: No long term residual effects Detailed Answer: Namasthe Welcome to healthcare-magic Greetings of the day Dear XXXX Oxandrolone is an Anabolic Steroid and is sometimes used in acute illness, severe trauma, major surgery. The main mechanism of action is exactly similar like Testosterone Hormone( The male hormone released by testis ) which is normally present hormone in male. The effects of anabolic steroid are very much similar to testosterone hormone and include Maintaining skeletal muscle mass, promoting wound healing, bone growth and also helps in blood formation( Erythropoesis). Short term use has very much beneficial effect. It does not cause alteration in which (Mutation). It is not a carcinogenic. As it was used for short term in your case, there is no cause for concern. There will be no residual effect present. Do remember testosterone is normally secreted the whole life and in presence of normal level it does not cause any excessive virilization. Rest be assured everything is allright. In case you need any further assisstance, do get back to me, will be glad to assist you. Take Care Wishing you a very happy new year Best regards Dr Deepak Kishore MBBS,MS,MCH Consultant Surgeon
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Follow-up: Does steroid treatment cause changes to cell and have residual effects? 22 hours later
Many thanks dr XXXXXXX I'm concerned the steroids I took caused me to become fertile during beginning of puberty. The reason for my stress is the 'first time' my body could produce sperm was initiated by steroids. Or is the above a wrong way of thinking? Does babies also technically have ability to produce sperm? (Technically speaking) Thanks
 
 
Answered by Dr. Deepak Kishore Kaltari 9 minutes later
Brief Answer: Anabolic Steroids does not have role in sperms Detailed Answer: Dear XXXX Anabolic steroids have no role in spermatogenis or sperm production. Spermatogenesis occurs actively around the time of puberty which may vary from 10- 14 years. The potential sperm producing cells are already present in a new born baby, but it will develop to mature sperms (by spermatogenesis) around puberty. It's quite acceptable to use short term anabolic steroid for specific and right indication. Take Care Best regards Dr XXXXXXX
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Follow-up: Does steroid treatment cause changes to cell and have residual effects? 22 hours later
Thank you Dr XXXXXXX But i thought testosterone is one of the hormones necessary for sperm development? And steroids is testosterone? Im stressed because i took steroids during pre-puberty/beginning of puberty, and concerned it lead to ' first time' maturation of sperm in my body. and also kickstarting my Lh and Fsh. So the steroid contributed directly, via action on testes, and indirectly via stimulating LSH/FSH, to completely permit sperm maturation. These 3 hromones are involved in sperm maturation. Or is there any other variable required for spermatogenisis?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Deepak Kishore Kaltari 1 hour later
Brief Answer: LH FSH surge initiate Spermatogenesis Detailed Answer: Hi Let me begin from the puberty to explain you. Every individual has a biological clock. Pituitary gland present in the brain is the master of all the endocrine glands and runs the orchestra . Around the time of set puberty pituitary gland releases LH and FSH( In stimulation to GnRH released by Hypothalamus). Luetinizing hormone (LH) acts on the Leydig cells present in Testis and causes synthesis and secretion of Testosterone. Testosterone causes appearance of secondary sexual characters. FSh hormone acts on sertoli cells and promotes Spermatogenesis. Testosterone only acts to promote vitality of sertoli cells. It is the LH and FSH surge at the time of Puberty which induces spermatogenesis. So do not be worried about short term use of Anabolic steroids used around puberty. In case you need further assistance, will be glad to assist you. Take Care Best regards Dr Deepak
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Follow-up: Does steroid treatment cause changes to cell and have residual effects? 13 hours later
Thank you Dr XXXXXXX for the advice. Something has always intrigued regarding the Lh/FSH surge. This surge of hormones exist in newborn male babies for 6 months. Yet in babies it doesnt lead to spermatogenesis. Why? Is it because of an underlying mechanism that permits spermatogenesis in puberty but not in baby? Hope you can give your valued opinion. Wishing you all the best Regards, Rony
 
 
Answered by Dr. Deepak Kishore Kaltari 1 hour later
Brief Answer: fetal fsh surge causes primitive sperm formation Detailed Answer: Dear XXXX After the fertilisation of the ovum occurs with sperm. It determines the chromosomal sex, normally if the resulting genotype of the fertilised ovum is 46 XY; is is chromosome wise male. The Y chromosome induces many things. The gonad which is ambiguous differentiates into testis under the influence of Y chromosome. Leydig cells and sertoli cell are formed . Leydig cells secrete testosterone autonomous that is on its own initially and later under influence of Lh released by pituitary of fetus. It causes the development of male genitalia. Under the influence of fsh of fetus the stem cells differentiate into primordial gametocyte or primitive sperm cells and remain in that state till the second fsh surge which occurs at puberty causes their final maturity. The first Lh and fsh surge or increased level occurs in the utero that is when the baby is still In the womb of mother. This surge helps in differentiation of the baby into males and the formation of gametocyte in the testis( primitive sperms ) . This surge also helps in testicular descent. If you look at embryology, testis is fetus are normally present inside the abdomen in the region of kidney, the Lh and fsh surge promotes the descent in the final position to make it lie outside the body into cavity called as scrotum. So I would once reassure that short term use of steroid does not affect it. Rest be assured everything is alright. It is not the exogenous or endogenous steroid which kick start final maturation into mature sperms but it is the lh and fsh surge which causes it, independent of other factors In case you require any further assistance, will be glad to assist you. Take care Best Regards Dr Deepak Kishore MBBS, MS, MCH Consultant Surgeon
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Follow-up: Does steroid treatment cause changes to cell and have residual effects? 23 hours later
Thank you Dr XXXXXXX for your time and valued opinions. I have one further query. We established from above LH and Fsh is responsible for kickstarting final sperm maturation...but what if the steroids i took stimulated the LH and Fsh surge? That would mean, indirectly, steroid did kickstart final maturation? Best Regards, Rony
 
 
Answered by Dr. Deepak Kishore Kaltari 8 minutes later
Brief Answer: LH SURGE OCCURS INDEPENDENT OF STEROID LEVEL Detailed Answer: Hi Greetings Hypothalamus and Pituitary gland collectively known as Hypothalamus_Pituitary axis(HPA) collectively act as one unit and they have their own biological clock. The surge occurs at the fixed time set for every different individual. Lh causes release of Testosterone, when the Testosterone level is High it will suppress the further release of Lh by negative feed back mechanism. This leads to normalisation of the Testosterone. Exogenously given anabolic steroid are unlikely to alter the Hpa axis. It's the lh and fsh surge which is important in kick starting spermatogenesis not the elevated testosterone or anabolic steroid. Rest be assured there is no cause for concern. Take care Best Regards Dr Deepak Kishore MBBS, MS, MCH
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Follow-up: Does steroid treatment cause changes to cell and have residual effects? 10 minutes later
Hello Dr XXXXXXX I see and undertsand the negative feedback mechanism. But could it be slightly possible steroids taken right before puberty/beginning of puberty, possibly have an opposite effect and actually progress the HPA? For example, can it 'reset' what normal level of circulating testosterone should be? This is my final question and i wish you all the best. Kind Regards, Rony
 
 
Answered by Dr. Deepak Kishore Kaltari 1 hour later
Brief Answer: Exogenous steroid does not alter Hpa axis Detailed Answer: Hi Greetings Dear XXXX Hpa biological clock is fixed and the onset of time of surge is also fixed for a given individual. Exogenous steroid for short term will not alter it. Rest be assured everything is alright. Wishing you a happy and healthy life. Take care Best Regards Dr Deepak Kishore MBBS, MS, MCH
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