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Does cardiac angiogram involve radiation exposure?

DOCTOR OF THE MONTH - Apr 2014
Apr 2014
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Radiologist
Practicing since : 2004
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Hi, I would like to know if a cardiac CT (or cardiac angiogram) involves much radiation exposure? There are some suggestions that low-dose machines can do the procedure with less than 1mSv of radiation exposure. Is this really realistic or possible given that sometimes radiation exposures as high as 10mSv have been quoted for this procedure? Also, does a CT angiogram have any greater radiation exposure than cardiac CT typically? Is it correct to say that a CT calcium scoring procedure will typically involve less than 1mSv of radiation exposure? Lastly, if a cardiac MRI does not give information on level of plaque deposits or narrowing of arteries, then what is its current usage? Thankyou.
Posted Tue, 25 Feb 2014 in X-ray, Lab tests and Scans
 
 
Answered by Dr. Indu Kumar 1 hour later
Brief Answer: Second generation dual Source CT can give 1mSv. Detailed Answer: Hello XXXXXXX Thanks for writing to us Yes,it is possible to give low dose radiation to the patients as low as 1mSv with second generation dual Source CT against single source 64 MDCT or first generation dual source CT. In general by low voltage technique we can reduce the effective radiation dose to the patients as low as 2–4 mSv independent of the scanner system. Further dose reduction i,e about 1mSv can be achieved by high pitch CT technique which is possible with second generation dual Source CT.Increasing the pitch results in decreased radiation dose as the patient is exposed to radiation for a shorter period of time. It is right that MRI heart is not good for calcium scoring.MRI is much informative in structural problems of the heart. Hope i have answered your query. Further queries are most welcome. Take Care Dr.Indu XXXXXXX
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Does cardiac angiogram involve radiation exposure? 23 hours later
Thankyou Dr. XXXXXXX for the details. I also wonder if the techniques used (increased pitch) significantly affect the quality of images or level of information obtained in the case of cardiac CT. Thanks, Regards.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Indu Kumar 1 hour later
Brief Answer: Image quality is not compromised in dual source CT Detailed Answer: Hello XXXXXXX Thanks for writing back High pitch technique doesn't compromise image quality and information needed in second generation dual Source CT. Image quality deterioration is the problem in single source CT,so you don't worry about this. Hope i have answered your query. Further queries are most welcome. Take Care Dr.Indu XXXXXXX
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Does cardiac angiogram involve radiation exposure? 16 hours later
Thanks Dr. XXXXXXX Previously, I asked you concerning abdominal CT. Is the dual source CT with less than 1mSv radiation possible for a general abdominal scan, it sounds like a reasonable amount as even an abdominal x-ray gives almost the same radiation exposure. Also, I checked the website http://www.xrayrisk.com/ and it gives the coronary cardiac CT scan radiation exposure as 16 mSv for a standard procedure. Should this be considered to be outdated information, as there is a very big difference between 16 mSv for radiation exposure and 1 mSv. Thankyou and regards.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Indu Kumar 8 hours later
Brief Answer: 16 mSv is relevent for single source 64 MDCT. Detailed Answer: Hello XXXXXXX Thanks for writing back Radiation exposure as much as 16 mSv is delivered by single source 64 MDCT. Radiation dose is much reduced with new second generation dual Source CT,it is as low as 1mSv. So radiation exposure about 16 mSv is relevent for single source 64 MDCT. Hope i have answered your query. Further queries are most welcome. Take Care Dr.Indu XXXXXXX
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