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Developed sore throat, itchy rashes after unprotected oral sex and protected vaginal sex. Risk for HIV?

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HIV AIDS Specialist
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Unprotected oral sex and protected vaginal sex with high risk man 7 weeks ago. Two weeks later developed sore throat. It did not resolve went to dr. Placed on zpack. End of antibiotics developed thrush which resolved with 7 days oral nystatin oral rinse. Still have irritated throat for a total of 4 weeks. Seven weeks exposure basically yesterday developed red non itchy spots on my breasts and my back. Based on what I have seen I would call it maculopapular like HIV rash. All blood work is still pending including std panel.I thought I was good being 7 weeks post exposure until I developed the rash. I basically think I must have HIV. Please comment what you think. Thank you. Are there any other diseases that could cause this including stds. Chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, syphilis etc
Posted Mon, 13 May 2013 in HIV and AIDS
 
 
Answered by Dr. S. Murugan 2 hours later
Hi,
Welcome to XXXXXXX

Thanks for posting your query.

You had your vaginal sex as a protected one. Only oral sex is not protective.
Oral sex carries a very low risk for HIV.

Sore throat could be either due to a nonspecific bacterial infection like Strepto Cooci or it may be do STD organism like Gonorrhea or Chlamydia.
Tablet. Azithromycin is a good choice. Sometimes it may likely to miss to hit the bacteria. It is better, you to go for a Culture and sensitivity test with a throat swab for both Nonspecific and STD organisms and put the right antibiotic according to the outcome of the results.

Non itchy rashes on your breast also is not necessarily due to HIV.
Only by doing HIV test we can rule out the possibility of HIV. But the cahnces of HIV is very low only.
Get well soon.
DR S.Murugan.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Developed sore throat, itchy rashes after unprotected oral sex and protected vaginal sex. Risk for HIV? 36 minutes later
Actually six weeks exposure just developed the typical ars rash on breasts and back. I'm in the medical field so am quite scared. The rash is on my breasts and my back, so torso maculopapular rash. I am awaiting my HIV test 5 weeks post exposure and full std panel. Please tell me what you think for real, and won't hold anybody accountabl
 
 
Answered by Dr. S. Murugan 6 hours later
Hi,
Welcome back.

Skin rash over your back and front following 5 weeks after exposure may or not be related to HIV, if infected, or may not be due to HIV. Rashes as early manifestations in HIV is not quite common.

Non itchy rashes also may be due to exanthem of any viral or rarely a bacterial infection also.

So only with the HIV test only we can be of sure whether the lesions are due to HIV or not.
But the chances of HIV in you is very low.
Dr S.Murugan
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Developed sore throat, itchy rashes after unprotected oral sex and protected vaginal sex. Risk for HIV? 7 hours later
So got my HIV antibody test back today and it was negative. Can a rash be the only sign of HIV? I developed the rash two days after the negative test. I'm wondering if test would have been positive when I developed the rash. I know I have to do a follow up test just wanted your thoughts. Thank you
 
 
Answered by Dr. S. Murugan 10 hours later
Hi,
Welcome back.
Skin rashes alone could not be early HIV manifestation.

HIV antibody test after 5 weeks is not conclusive. It has to be repeated after 12 weeks. Otherwise tests like HIV DNA PCR 0r P24 or a Combo/Duo test would be ideal to confirm at this stage.

Still your chances of getting HIV are remote. So you need not worry about the same.
Dr S.Murugan
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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