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Confirmed with HSV 1 and 2. Also have diabetes and hypothyroidism. Have had itchy bumps. Why is it recurring again?

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Internal Medicine Specialist
Practicing since : 1998
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Hi,
I have been confirmed to have both HSV1 and HSV 2. This was several years ago and until 2 years ago I had no symptoms. In the past couple of years HSV 2 has come quite regularly and now basically every 3-4 weeks I have it. I also have some autoimmune diseases being Type 1 Diabetes and hypothyroidism as the main ones. I am wondering why I would now be getting recurrances regularly and if this is anything due to the autoimmune problems? Also I want to know if you can spread it to other areas of your body yourself ie legs and arms at any point as I have had a few random bumps that became itchy. I thought they were just insect bites but when I scratched them they shortly after turned to like a dried scabby blister and lasted for 3 weeks. They weren't sore just itchy. Please advise? thanks
Posted Mon, 20 May 2013 in Skin Hair and Nails
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pankaj Malhan 1 hour later
Hi

Thanks for asking.

Herpes simplex 1 and 2 both are the recurrent diseases, presenting with recurrences in the time.

Although having other autoimmune disorders put someone to the higher risk of recurrences, the relationship is not so well defined.

In addition, if you have quite a few recurrences, it is advisable to use some antiviral continuously to prevent/decrease the recurrences.

Herpes is an infective disorder, so it possible to have lesions spread to different parts of the body from the primary lesions.

Thanks, please let me know if you need further information.
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Follow-up: Confirmed with HSV 1 and 2. Also have diabetes and hypothyroidism. Have had itchy bumps. Why is it recurring again? 17 hours later
Thanks for your answer. Can you confirm how the process of transferring to myself in other sites can occur -
1. Does it only occur if I touch an active sore and then touch another area immediately after?
2. Can it happen if I touch the normal site but when it has no sores at the time and then another site?
3. If either of the above occur would a sore on the new site occur straight away or can I have touched a sore or the site and another site after but no sore occurs in the new site for 2 years?
Basically I want to know how easy it is to spread to myself and would it be immediate. I just want to confirm if at any point in the past 10 years I could have innocently touched the area and then another site ie in shower or sleeping and then not knowing but in the future will get a sore in new sites ie legs or arms etc
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pankaj Malhan 47 minutes later
Hi

Sometimes, infected people can transmit the virus and infect other parts of their own bodies (most often the hands, thighs, or buttocks). This process, known as auto inoculation, is uncommon, since people generally develop antibodies that protect against this problem.

So infecting other parts of the body from the primary infection is possible but not very common because of the above mentioned reason.

Thanks.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Confirmed with HSV 1 and 2. Also have diabetes and hypothyroidism. Have had itchy bumps. Why is it recurring again? 24 minutes later
Ok, should I still get the current itchy bumps swabbed at all to confirm?
Also my last concern is Ocular Herpes, about 2 years after I first got HSV 2 (HSV1 was as a child) I suddenly got a very sore throat and one eye formed this big clear air bubble over my eye. I went to Emergency and somehow they burst it and gave me some kind of prescription. Said at time could be bacterial or viral. The eye didn't hurt or itch or anything just looked scary. It never came back again. Then a couple of years ago for diabetes I had to have laser on my eye. Since then my eye has been red, stings, tears and at time blurred vision and pain in the back of my eyeball. I assumed this was purely from the laser until I learnt of Ocular herpes and that it can be dormant for many years. Do you think that these symptoms are ocular herpes as I am beginning to be concerned that they sound similar? Please confirm
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pankaj Malhan 4 hours later
Hi

Yes, you can get it swabbed to confirm the diagnosis.

Regarding ocular hepes, it can present in different ways and the severity can vary as well. If your symptoms are not subsiding /getting worse, you probably need to get it checked by an ophthalmologist, rather than assuming that it is because of Laser.

Thanks.
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Follow-up: Confirmed with HSV 1 and 2. Also have diabetes and hypothyroidism. Have had itchy bumps. Why is it recurring again? 46 minutes later
Is Ocular herpes from HSV 1 or 2
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pankaj Malhan 37 minutes later
Type 2 causes genital herpes; herpes simplex 1 causes ocular herpes.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Confirmed with HSV 1 and 2. Also have diabetes and hypothyroidism. Have had itchy bumps. Why is it recurring again? 22 hours later
Can I please clarify, after the first infection if you come into contact with a new herpes virus I was under the impression that the second isn't as bad due to the body having antibodies from the first.
I have had HSV 1 when I was a child but got 2 as an adult however I pretty much never have recurrences of the first type 1 and regularly get type 2 now. Why is that? Secondly I haven't ever taken antiviral tablets but over the past months now I basically have type 2 75% of the month. What is the reason my type 2 is now constant and type 1 stopped and why is type 2 now occurring a lot when for the first 10 years I barely had any recurrences.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pankaj Malhan 34 minutes later
Hi

The pattern is very variable, some times the virus can lay dormant for many years and then become active , while in some cases it can have recurrent infections after few days.

There is no way to predict, which patient is going to get recurrences soon and which won't get them at all.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Confirmed with HSV 1 and 2. Also have diabetes and hypothyroidism. Have had itchy bumps. Why is it recurring again? 22 minutes later
Ok I guess I should start antiviral tablets.
One more question for ocular herpes. Is it visible in the eye?
I just have red, stinging eye which sometimes tears and sometimes painful but no actual sore or blister on the eye? So would you be able to see it or how would I know if I have that?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pankaj Malhan 17 minutes later
You cannot see anything yourself in the eye to diagnose it as herpes.

It needs a slit lamp examination by ophthalmologist.
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Follow-up: Confirmed with HSV 1 and 2. Also have diabetes and hypothyroidism. Have had itchy bumps. Why is it recurring again? 14 minutes later
I have seen pictures on the internet of people with blisters around their eyes so I wanted to know as I have not had that at all
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pankaj Malhan 10 minutes later
Blisters around the eye no way rules out whether there is herpes in the eye or not. So someone without blisters can have herpes in the eye and vice a versa.
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