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Child has snively nose, developed bad cough, cheeks grew red, firm stools. Is it normal?

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Internal Medicine Specialist
Practicing since : 1998
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We are currently on holiday at a resort and can't easily consult a doctor so wanted to check my son's condition. He is almost 4 years old. He has had a snivelly nose for weeks now but about 3 days ago developed a hackling cough which doesn't bring anything up. Approximately 1 week ago he has sickness for 24 hours a so and therefore ate next to nothing. His stools have now returned to firm-ish. Yesterday his cheeks started going red and today they are more red with tiny white spots on the skin surface (amongst the redness). He is generally tired which may be in part due to lack of continuous good sleep at night due to the coughing. Inside his mouth (as far as we can see) it looks normal. Please advise on the possibilities
Posted Thu, 3 May 2012 in Child Health
 
 
Answered by Dr. Jasvinder Singh 18 minutes later
Hello,
Thanks for posting your query.

I can understand your concern for the symptoms that your child is having. Due to sudden onset of symptoms, it seems like Fifth disease which is a viral infection.

The ill child typically has a "slapped-cheek" rash on the face and the child may have a low-grade fever, malaise, or a "cold" a few days before the rash breaks out.

Since it is a viral infection, hence antibiotics may not be required, as it is used to treat bacterial infections. Give plenty of fluids especially water to your child and if there is any fever then he may need Acetaminophen for which you have to consult a doctor.

If there is any associated itching on the rash, then you may apply calamine lotion on the rash.

You can consult a pediatrician, if the symptoms are not resolving with the above measures.

Hope, this answers your query. Please accept my answer in case you do not have further queries.

Regards.





Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Child has snively nose, developed bad cough, cheeks grew red, firm stools. Is it normal? 3 hours later
Hi and thanks for your reply but can to tell me the prognosis? How long might it last? Is there likley to be any change in symptoms?

I have just taken his temperature as he seemed hot and its 38.9 in one ear and 38.4 in the other. How does that seem?

Thanks
Follow-up: Child has snively nose, developed bad cough, cheeks grew red, firm stools. Is it normal? 14 hours later
Hello Dr.
There have been developments:
Last night he woke repeatedly with severe stomach pains.
After 6 times he slept and this morning the pains have gone.
However he now has ear pain in one ear and he cant hear through this ear!
Should we visit a doctor to get this ear looked at? Anything else we should do?
Thanks
Follow-up: Child has snively nose, developed bad cough, cheeks grew red, firm stools. Is it normal? 28 minutes later
8.45am. He has just vomited all his milk thst he hsd 20 mins ago. Maybe because of so much cougjing.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Jasvinder Singh 2 hours later
Hello,

Thanks for writing back.

It looks like a viral or bacterial infection which is causing the gastrointestinal symptoms as well as ear pain. It would be better to consult an ENT specialist at the earliest.

Till the time when you take your child to the doctor, please maintain the hydration/fluid electrolyte level of the child with water mixed with Oral Rehydration Salt (ORS) or by juices or drinks which the child likes (except carbonated drinks). Maintain temperature charting and do not give aspirin as it can cause Rye’s syndrome. You can give acetaminophen after consulting his doctor.

A course of antibiotic is entailed after discussing with your doctor.

Hope, this answers your query. Please accept my answer in case you do not have further queries.

Regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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