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Cervical spine x-ray,normal bone density,cervical spondylosis,osteophytes

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Sir i have gone through two x-rays
X-Ray Cervical spine AP/Lateral view:
Shows normal bone density of the visulized bones, there is straightening of the cervical spine due to muscle spasm. Small osteophytes are seen C3 to C6 cervical vertebrae, Intervertebral disc space are maintained. No bony cervical rib seen.
Findings are suggestive of Mild cervical spondylosis with muscle spasm.
X-Ray L S Spine AP and Lateral view:
Shows normal bone density of the visualized bines. There is a Exaggeration of lumbar lordosis, small osteophytes are seen all lumbar verterbrae.Intervertebral disc space is reduced between L5/S1 vertebrae. There is sacralization of left transverse of L5 with S1 vertebrae. Both SI joint appear normal.
Finding are suggestive of Mild Lumbar spondylosis with PIVD L5/S1 vertebrae.
Posted Thu, 12 Apr 2012 in Brain and Spine
 
 
Answered by Dr. Kiran Kumar 21 minutes later
Hi XXXXXXX
Thanks for the query.

Your X XXXXXXX of the Cervical spin is suggestive of Mild Cervical Spondyloisis. There is no active intervention required for this. However, you should consider getting a physiotherpay advice regarding specific neck exercises which will help you prevent further worsening.

X XXXXXXX of the LS Spine is suggestive of Mild Lumbar spondylosis with PIVD L5/S1 vertebrae. The concern here is reduced disc space between L5 and S1. This is most likely due to disc degeneration with likely disc prolapse. The symptoms associated with this findings will be low back ache with or without radiation of pain to the legs.

If you have symptoms, you should get a MRI Scan of LS Spine. This will help delineate the disc disease in detail. Discs are not visible on plain X Rays.
Usually, rest and physiotherapy suffice in most cases.

If however, symptoms persists inspite of physiotherapy, surgical decompression of the involved disc is the best option.

Hope this answers your query.

Please get back if you need any further information

Thanks and Regards

Dr Kiran
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Cervical spine x-ray,normal bone density,cervical spondylosis,osteophytes 17 hours later
Respected Dr. XXXXXXX XXXXXXX
I want to know that is MRI LS is required on urgent basis or should i take medicine and physiotherapy for 10 days and if it persist then i can go for MRI. will MRI findings can have tumor or multiple myleoma type problem? please let me know about the same. I shall be very thankful to you.

XXXXXXX
 
 
Answered by Dr. Kiran Kumar 2 hours later
Hi XXXXXXX
Thanks for the follow up.

MRI Scan will be needed if you have symptoms of pain. Its not a urgency, however as a necessity in evaluating suspected Disc Disease.

Rest and Physiotherapy will definitely reduce your pain. You can consider getting physiotherapy for 2 weeks and see how is the response. If you do not get good response, you can go for the MRI scan.

And, its very unlikely to be related to tumor or multiple myeloma. Infact Myeloma is better identified in plain X rays..

At your age, most likely cause will be either muscular spasm or a disc disease.

Hope this answers your query.

Take care

Dr Kiran
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Cervical spine x-ray,normal bone density,cervical spondylosis,osteophytes 30 days later
Respected sir
I have MRI Lumbo Sacral spine with whole spine screening.
Observations: TRANSITIONAL VERTEBRA SEEN WITH RUDIMENTARY L5-S1 DISC.
The Lumbar curvature is lost s/o muscle spasm. verebral alignment is intact.
Early degenerative changesb are seen as small osteophytes alignment at L4 and L5 levels. otherwise, all the lumbar vertebral bodies appear normal in height, shape, cortical outline and display essentially normal marrow SI.
L2-3 and L3-4 discs are partially dehydrated with dessication of L4-5 disc. Heights of intervertebral discs are well maintained.
At L3-4, mild annular disc bulge causes mild thecal sac effacement with no neural canal compression.
At L4-5, annular disc bulge coupled with central disc protrusion and facet joint arthropathy cause mild thecal sac effacement, mild bilateral recess narrowing and moderate compression of bilateral neural foramina with probable impingement of the exiting nerve roots.
At L5-S1 level, annular disc bulge is coupled with left posterolateral disc protrusion causing mild thecal saceffacement and mild left neural canal compression with no impingement of the left exiting nerve root.
Mild facet joint hypertrophy is seen at L3-4 and L4-5.
No significant ligamentum flavum thickening is seen.
Rest of the thecal sac and its content appear unremarkable. No e/o any intra spinal mass seen.
Spinal cord under view and the conus medullaris display essentially normal signal intensity.
Pre and the paravertebral soft tissues appear unremarkable.
Mid body sagittal diameters of the spinal canal (in MM) are as follows:
L1 14.5 L2 12.3 L3 12.2 L4 09.1 L5 12.7
Sagittal diameters of the spinal canal (in MM) at discs levels are as follows:
L1-2 14.8 L2-3 12.3 L3-4 10.7 L4-5 08.7 L5-S1 13.3
Screening of rest of the spine shows normal height, alignment and marrow signal intensity of all the visualised cervico dorsal vertebral bodies. Annular disc bulges are seen at C3-4, C4-5, C5-6 and C6-7 levels causing mild thecal sac effacement. the cervicomedullary junction and spinal cord in the cervico dorsal region shows normal bulk and SI.

IMPRESSION :- SCAN FINDINGS ARE SUGGESTIVE OF :
a) Mild Lumbar spondylosis.
b) TRANSITIONAL VERTEBRA SEEN WITH RUDIMENTARY L5-S1 DISC.
c) At L3-4, mild annular disc bulge causes mild thecal sac effacement with no neural canal compression.
d) At L4-5, annular disc bulge coupled with central disc protrusion and facet joint arthropathy cause mild thecal sac effacement, mild bilateral recess narrowing and moderate compression of bilateral neural foramina with probable impingement of the exiting nerve roots.
e)At L5-S1 level, annular disc bulge is coupled with left posterolateral disc protrusion causing mild thecal saceffacement and mild left neural canal compression with no impingement of the left exiting nerve root.
f)Mild facet joint hypertrophy is seen at L3-4 and L4-5.
g) Screening of rest of the spine shows Annular disc bulges are seen at C3-4, C4-5, C5-6 and C6-7 levels causing mild thecal sac effacement
Please let me know regarding the MRI report, what is the treatment for the same and also is there in serious problem came in MRI.

With Regards

XXXXXXX
 
 
Answered by Dr. Kiran Kumar 3 days later
Hi XXXXXXX

The most relevant and significant finding in your MRI is the L4-L5 and L5-S1 disc prolapse and thecal indentation. In L4-L5 region, there is moderate compression of the neural foramina.

Now, if you have low back ache with pain going down the legs, its likely due to the disc disease. Muscle spasm occurs along with disc disease and contributes to pain.

Regarding what needs to be done:

Again rest and physiotherapy are the first line of management along with hot fomentation. A good physiotherapist will help you with this.

However, there are no major changes in your Spine. You need not worry much.

Treatment options are both Surgical and Medical management.

Medical management includes use of analgesics, exercises, proper posture and back rest.

Surgical management includes various decompression surgeries.

I do not feel there is a need for surgical management now.

You can try the conservative mangement with medicines.

However, if your symptoms persist or increase, you will need to consult a Neurosurgeon for possible surgical decompression.

Hope this answers your query.

Wish you a speedy recovery.

Take Care.

Dr Kiran
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