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CT scan brain shows small tight gliotic area with adjacent bony changes & csf density. What does it mean?

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hi "my ct scan for brain shows features suggestive of small tight gliotic area with adjacent bony changes" what does that mean plz
Posted Tue, 8 May 2012 in Brain and Spine
Follow-up: CT scan brain shows small tight gliotic area with adjacent bony changes & csf density. What does it mean? 34 minutes later
as well as csf density
 
 
Answered by Dr. Shiva Kumar R 12 hours later
Hello,

Thanks for the query.

From the information provided it looks like probably you are suffering from chronic headache which could be either migraine or Tension type headache or combination of these. More detailed symptoms description would help in arriving at the diagnosis.

Your CT (Computerized Tomography) scan shows features of old gliosis. Gliosis adjacent to the skull bone suggests possibility of old trauma to the head.

So I personally feel Chronic headache and gliosis are two independent problems. Gliosis is not responsible for your daily headaches. You need to consult your Neurologist for evaluation of chronic headaches and to get started on the required medications.

Let me know if I have missed out any other concern in your question.

Yet again, I duly appreciate your query to me, I do hope that you have found something useful to help you and I shall be glad to answer any further apprehensions.

Sincerely,

Dr Shiva Kumar R
Neurologist & Epileptologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: CT scan brain shows small tight gliotic area with adjacent bony changes & csf density. What does it mean? 8 hours later
the ct brain says:
Well-defiend hypodense area (csf density) is noted in the right parietal lobe representing encephalomalacia/gliosis
Apart from that area ,the cerebral cortical hemispheres demonstrate normal gyri with preserved grey/white matter differentiation.

the visualized skull bones show sharp defect in the right parietal bone with adjacent inner table calcification (just near the right partietal lobe hypodensity.

in 2007 i went to the hospital suffering from numbness in my right side i felt as if my face was swellen up and they said is stroke and gave me asprin >
before i made the new ct above the headache returned with awful pain mixed with the feeling to vomit as weel as ahigh blood pressure 150/100 and the numbness returned back to me.i also feel very hot all the time with high heart beat and agreen /browen spot appear in my right side

note in 2007 i didnt have bloodpressure before 3 years i got it
please i want to know whatim suffring of
 
 
Answered by Dr. Shiva Kumar R 1 hour later
Hello

Thanks for the query

Gliosis on the CT scan can occuer either due to trauma or stroke. However adjacent bony changes favor the former. High blood pressure is another cause for the episodic headache and usually disappears once BP is controlled.

So I personally feel control of BP is required to see if fluctuatung BP is the cause of headache. If headache's persisit with normal BP then you should see your Neurologist for further evaluation.

Wishing you good health,

Regards,

Dr Shiva Kumar R
Neurologist & Epileptologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: CT scan brain shows small tight gliotic area with adjacent bony changes & csf density. What does it mean? 23 minutes later

its persist with normal BP and i feel it in my eyes i send you my reports one of the heart mitral valve shows : mild thickening and prolapse (scalloping) of the body of anterior leaflet e/a 1.41 ivrt;72 msec
 
 
Answered by Dr. Shiva Kumar R 12 hours later
Hello,
Thanks for the query.
I would like to re-emphasize that gliosis can be as a sequel of an old injury to the head. If headache persists with controlled blood pressure, detailed evaluation and consultation is required by a neurologist to exclude other causes of headache.
Although migraine, I personally feel you need to consult your neurologist so that an evaluation of chronic headaches can be done and appropriate treatment can be started.
Let me know if I have missed out any other concern in your question.

Regards,

Dr Shiva Kumar R
Neurologist & Epileptologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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