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Brain MRI showed focus of prolongation within the superior right frontal lobe. Multiple sclerosis?

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Practicing since : 2001
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Hi Dr. XXXXXXX
I received results back from an MRI of my brain that read "2.33 focus of prolongination within the superior right frontal lobe within the sub cortical white matter. Non-specific finding. No evidence of demylenation, non-specific finding XXXXXXX My dr. dismissed this. In lay-woman's terms...What on Earth does this mean? Is it common? I am 38 and otherwise healthy .I am concerned that this could be indicative of MS, or serious? I have read where these types of findings are common. Is this case? I am allowing this to consume me with all of these online forums. Help! Do you recommend a follow up? One person said the location being the superior right frontal lobe is non consistent with MS or migraines.
Posted Mon, 15 Apr 2013 in Brain and Spine
 
 
Answered by Dr. Gopal Krishna Dash 8 minutes later
Hello Mam,

Thanks for your query,

I understand your concern

Let me tell you that in Neurology practice, one must correlate the imaging findings with the clinical data. Per se imaging findings does not mean anything. The cause of the findings that you have described could be due to so many causes and may even be a normal variant. If you are asymptomatic and MRI was done routinely for other indication, you do not have to worry at all. Further, if you are asymptomatic, you donot ned any follow up.

Hope this clarifies
Please get back to me in case you have any other query in this regard
Best wishes
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Brain MRI showed focus of prolongation within the superior right frontal lobe. Multiple sclerosis? 1 hour later
To clarify, are you saying that this finding is insignificant as it says that it is "non-specific" and that I should not worry about it? Would the statement that reads that their is "no evidence of demylenation" indicate that "the focus" does not correlate with MS?
I do have fibromyalgia symptons that have been on going for 11 years and have had 2 negative MRI's previously to this one, each five years apart. I would imagine that if this was a case of MS then it would have been reflected in these MRI's as well?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Gopal Krishna Dash 5 minutes later
Hello,

Thanks for the feed-back

Yes, The findings are insignificant and you should not be worried about it. Yes, the focus does not correlate at all with MS. Yes, over years in true cases of MS, MRI will certainly be positive

Best wishes
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Brain MRI showed focus of prolongation within the superior right frontal lobe. Multiple sclerosis? 39 hours later
How common are these "UBO's?" And how can I be sure that this is not a tumor or a lesion? What is the differrence between these three terms and where are MS lesions usually present? What area of is the brain sub-cortial white matter? In my reading the white matter is where MS lesions were said to be found. Excuse my panic. Just trying to rest easy that this is "not significant" in any way as it relates to MS or a tumor?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Gopal Krishna Dash 20 hours later
Hello,

UBO's may be seen in about 5 % of the scans in my practice. Usually radiologist can easily differentiate between these lesions and tumor or other lesion. MS lesions can be seen in the area where UBO is seen. MS lesions are not single and they are multiple, located in the white matter, close to corpus callosum, spinal cord, etc.

If you are concerned about this, get evaluated by another neurologist or a teaching medical university. If you still worried, go for a contrast MRI.

My medical opinion is that if you are asymptomatic, you can just relax.

Best wishes
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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