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At which time of the ovulation period should the contraceptive pills be taken?

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Do i have to start taking the contraceptive pill on the first day of my period or can i start at any time?
Posted Fri, 4 May 2012 in Birth Control
 
 
Answered by Dr. Rakhi Tayal 26 minutes later
Hello
Thanks for writing to us.

For an effective contraceptive effect if you are taking the pills for the very first time, you must start taking them right from the day 1 of your periods- when your periods start.

After finishing the 21 active pills, you need to take the seven red coloured false pills if they are present or give a seven day pill free interval before starting with a fresh pack.

Your periods will begin on day 3 to 5 of this pill free interval.

Starting the pill anytime during the cycle may alter the duration of your cycle and will not provide contraception from the first cycle.

If you are taking the pills only to regularize your cycles then you can start taking them from day 5 of your cycle also.

I hope my answer and recommendations are adequate and helpful. Waiting for your further follow up queries if any.

Regards.



Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: At which time of the ovulation period should the contraceptive pills be taken? 7 hours later
If your start taking the pill on say day 13 or 14 of your cycle how long will it take for it to provide complete contraception from pregnancy?
Follow-up: At which time of the ovulation period should the contraceptive pills be taken? 7 minutes later
Hopefully this will clarify the previous question that i asked. My normal menstral cycle is about 31-32 days with a 7 to 8 day period. I've started taking the contraceptive pill on the day that i received the prescription from my doctor which was about day 13 of my cycle. I started by taking the first hormone pill that coincided with the day of the week. How long do i have to wait before i am completely protected from pregnancy?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Rakhi Tayal 16 minutes later
Hello.
Thanks for writing again.
If you have started taking the pill from day 13 then you will have to use other methods in this cycle and it will provide you protection from next cycle onwards.
Regards.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: At which time of the ovulation period should the contraceptive pills be taken? 10 hours later
I have read in a lot of place on the net that talk about the contraceptive pill that no matter what time in your cylce you start taking the pill so long as you've been taking it for 7 days you should be protected agains't pregnancy. Approximately what percentage would you be protected if you took the hormone pills for nearly two weeks but still started on the 13th day of your cycle? Thanks
 
 
Answered by Dr. Rakhi Tayal 3 hours later
Hello.
Thanks for writing again.
Almost all the contraceptive pills do provide some protection from pregnancy after you have taken them for 7 days continuously but the chances of failure are higher around 8-10%. After two weeks also, the chances of protection are not more than 95%.
Wishing you an early recovery.
Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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