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56 years old. Test showed raised creatinine level. How to control this level?

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my brother's creatinine level have shot up to 5.9. what is the process to bring it down.
his age is 56 and weighing 113 kgs . HE IS BASICALLY LONG STANDING HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE PATIENT AND SINCE LAST 8 YRS HE IS DIABETIC. PRESENTLY HIS DIABETIC IS UNDER CONTROL.
Posted Mon, 28 Jan 2013 in Urinary and Bladder Problems
 
 
Answered by Dr. G.Srinivasan 47 minutes later
Hi,
Welcome to XXXXXXX and thanks for your query.
He most probably has what is called chronic kidney disease, due to long standing high BP and sugar levels.
If creatinine is high for long, it is extremely unlikely to return back to normal, unless the kidneys have been obstructed by stone or prostate enlargement and that is likely to be corrected soon by a urologist. It depends on serial evaluation by a nephrologist/urologist.
The diet would consist of low salt, moderate protein intake and restricted water intake.
Weight reduction is a must. Strict control of sugar and BP are a must.
Kindly consult these docs early and get well asap. Also a dietitian would help in choosing the RENAL DIET.
Serum electrolytes need to be checked and dialysis may have to be started depending on various parameters.
Iron and calcium supplements will be necessary.
Wishing him best health.
Best regards
DR GS
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: 56 years old. Test showed raised creatinine level. How to control this level? 46 minutes later
Sir,

How does one deteremine if both the kidneys have got damaged. In this case in august 2011 he had his creatinine levels at 3.6

Secondly he has been a regular alcoholic drinker of 6 pegs a day and smoking plus gutka. He is a total vegetarain except at times he has eggs

When Diabetes is normal what can be the reason of sudden rise in creatinine levels
 
 
Answered by Dr. G.Srinivasan 3 hours later
Hi
Welcome back.
One kidney is enough to HAVE NORMAL CREATININE.
So high creatinine means both are damaged, the extent of which is decided based on serial tests like urine microalbumin, GFR tests. These can be done under the guidance of the nephrologist.
These habits are at-least not harmful for the kidneys.
Diabetes even under control can cause kidney damage.
Due to sudden rise in creatinine, a nephrology evaluation seems urgent.
Hope this helps,
Regards
DR GS
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: 56 years old. Test showed raised creatinine level. How to control this level? 15 hours later
Sir,

you have said 'These habits are at-least not harmful for the kidneys'. Does this mean there one can continue with alcohol and gutka.
 
 
Answered by Dr. G.Srinivasan 6 hours later
Hi
Welcome back.
Alcohol and gutka do not attack the kidneys directly.
But, UNFORTUNATELY they can cause problems in many other organs , for example gutka can cause oral cancer and alcohol can cause liver diseases including cancer.
NO DOCTOR WILL ENCOURAGE INTAKE OF THESE.
I wrote this, as it was discussion was on the kidneys.
Hope you understood the right way,
Many regards
DR GS
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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